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Science in Quarantine: A Rush to Go Remote

A photo of Laird Egan at a desk
Credit: Elizabeth Egan

In this episode, we look back at the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic, when impending lab closures were threatening scientific progress and graduate student careers. We sit down with Laird Egan, then a graduate student in physics at JQI, and hear about how he and his lab mates managed to turn their ion-based quantum computer into a remote-controlled experiment in a matter of weeks. We also learn how they used their newly remote lab to achieve a milestone in quantum computing.

This episode of Relatively Certain was produced by Dina Genkina, Chris Cesare, and Bailey Bedford. Music featured in this episode includes Picturebook by Dave Depper, New Launch by Independent Licensing Music Collective, Sophisticated Savage by Voodoo Suite and Last Bar Guests by Lobo Loco. Relatively Certain is a production of the Joint Quantum Institute, a research partnership between the University of Maryland and the National Institute of Standards and Technology, and you can find it on iTuens, Google Play, Soundcloud, or Spotify.

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